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The Ships

Sacramento on the beach at Ten Mile River

Sacremento on the beach at Ten Mile River

The Amethyst, second from left, and the scow, Sacramento, second from right, lined up in wait to load lumber at Albion wharf on August 15, 1897

Sacramento, second from right, lined up
in wait to load lumber at Albion wharf

Sacramento:

The Sacramento was built in San Francisco in 1868 for use as a river barge. In 1882, Henry Winkleman & Co. became her owners, who had her rebuilt and fitted with a keel. In October 1883, while bound for Westport, the Sacramento beached at Ten Mile Beach, about six miles north of Fort Bragg. She was repaired by March 1884 and put into Westport with her passengers, W. Norris, Henry Watkin, E.M. Jackson, and C.R. Johnson, founder of the Union Lumber Company.

The Sadie Danielsen loading from the chute at Newport

The Sadie Danielsen loading from the
chute at Newport

Sadie Danielson:

The Sadie Danielson was a sailing schooner that was stranded off of the Mendocino Coast in 1903.

Saginaw:

Built by Mathewws Shipbuilding Co. in Hoquiam, Washington in 1907. She displaced 886 tons. She was broken up in 1940.

Sailor Boy being loaded under the wire at Caspar

Sailor Boy being loaded under the
wire at Caspar.

Sailor Boy:

A three masted schooner known to have worked the doghole ports of the Mendocino Coast.

San Benito:

The San Benito was a steam collier. Launched in 1884 she was commanded by Captain William Smith. She was 350 feet long, 42 feet in the beam and displaced 2,811 tons. She was stranded and lost in 1896 off of the Mendocino Coast.

Samoa:

The Samoa was a wooden steam schooner of  377 tons, 151.0' x 33.5' x 10.7', with a 350 hp engine.  She was built in 1898 by Fulton Iron Works San Francisco. She displaced 377 tons.

Purchased 1902 from Beadle Steamship Co. by the Caspar Lumber Company, she was wrecked at Point Reyes on January, 28th, 1913.

Samoa

Click Photo to see all photos of the Samoa

The "Samoa" left Caspar with 360,000 feet of lumber and headed south. In a dense fog, in the early hours of the following day, January 29, 1913, the officers lost their bearings, ending up on the beach four miles north of Point Reyes. The weather was so dense that the crew could only see a yard or two from the ship. Fortunately the fireroom didn't flood immediately and they were able to blow the whistle which was heard by the crew at the lifesaving station, who had a difficult time in ascertaining the location of the "Samoa".

The lifesaving crew started shooting its line to the ship, and on the fifth try it fell on board. Soon a breeches buoy line was rigged and the ship's crew was brought ashore. The steamer, which had a value of $40,000, was a complete loss and so was the cargo, which was worth $1,000.

The Samoa Samoa at anchor off of Caspar Wreck of the Samoa Wreck of the Samoa Wreck of the Samoa
San Diego:

Built Mathewws Shipbuilding Co. in Portland, Oregon in 1918. She displaced 1,487 tons. She was laid up in Oakland Creek, San Francisco bay.

San Jacinto:

Built by Mathewws Shipbuilding Co. in Hoquiam, Washington in 1908. She displaced 614 tons. She was stranded and lost off of Cuba in 1944.

Wreck of the Steamer San Pedro in Humboldt County

Wreck of the Steamer San Pedro
in Humboldt County

San Pedro:

Built by John Lindstrom in Aberdeen, Washington in 1899. She displaced 456 tons. She sank in 1920.

Santa Ana:

Built by Reed Shipbuilding in Marshfield, Oregon in 1900. She displaced 1,203 tons. She was broken up in 1940.

The Santa Barbara on the rocks

The Santa Barbara on the rocks

The wreck of the Santa Barbara at Del Mar Landing (just south of Gualala on the Mendocino Coast), October 1, 1905; the tug boat, Pomo, can be seen in the background

The wreck of the Santa Barbara at Del Mar
Landing, October 1, 1905; the tug boat,
Pomo, can be seen in the background

Santa Barbara:

The steam schooner Santa Barbara was 250 feet, and drew 18 feet. She displaced 695 tons. and was built by W.G. Stone in San Francisco in 1900.

Owned by W.R. Hanify Co. of San Francisco, and commanded by Captain F. B. Zaddart, the Santa Barbara was en route from San Francisco to Seattle carrying 25 passengers and freight when she broke her propeller shaft on rocks close to shore. The passengers were put ashore by lifeboat, and Captain Zaddart went ashore to telephone for a tug. The tug boat, Pomo, pulled her off the rocks and steamed for San Francisco. The Pomo was soon joined by the steam schooner San Pedro, and they arrived at Hunter’s Point in San Francisco on Tuesday, October 3, 1905.

Captain Zaddart reported that the wreck was caused by the gross carelessness of second mate, Arthur Self, who failed to keep the steam schooner clear of rocks close to shore. After setting the course close to shore to avoid bad weather and turning the ship over to Self, Zaddart went to sleep. He reported to the San Francisco Call, ”I turned in, and was awakened by the sound of the backing bell. I went on deck, and found the schooner on the ledge just abreast of the lumber shoot. It was exactly 4:17 o’clock a.m. It was a little hazy, but the land was plainly visible and the stars were shining brightly. It was not what could be called thick weather.”

The wreck of the Santa Inez at Albion

The wreck of the Santa Inez at Albion

Santa Inez:

Nothing known of the Santa Inez except that she was wrecked at Albion.

Santa Monica:

Built by W.G. Stone in San Francisco in 1902. She displaced 497 tons.

Santiam:

Built by John McDade in 1916 at Fairhaven, California. She displaced 946 tons. She caught fire and sank off of Aberdeen, Washington in 1936.

Sarah Alexander:

Launched in 1883 and commanded by Captain Cousins she was a two masted schooner. She displaced 51 tons, was 55.5 feet long and 33 across the beam. The Sarah Alexander parted her lines and was lost off of the Mendocino Coast in 1889.

Sarah Louise:

The Sarah Louise was a sailing schooner launched in 1873.  She was 68 feet long and had a 22 foot beam.  She displaced 49 tons. In 1875 she dragged her anchor and was lost off of the Mendocino Coast.

The S.C. Allen loading at Fort Bragg

The S.C. Allen loading at Fort Bragg

S.C. Allen:

The S.C. Allen was a wooden three-masted bark built in 1888 by the New England Shipbuilding Co. of Bath, Maine. Owned by Allen & Robinson Ltd. of Honolulu, her home port was Honolulu.
The S.C. Allen was 690 tons, 177 x 37 x 14 ft with a single deck. She wrecked off Diamond Head on the coast of O’ahu, Hawaii, October 13, 1913. She operated along the Mendocino Coast.

Scotia:

Built by Hay & Wright in San Francisco in 1888. She displaced 181 tons. She was stranded and lost off of Purisima Point on July 28, 1914.

Sea Foam:

A two masted schooner launched in 1873. She was owned by L.C. Peterson and commanded by Captain Bacht and displaced 92 tons. The Sea Foam capsized and was lost off Point Arena in 1885.

Seafoam (second of the same name):

Built by John Lindstrom in Aberdeen, Washington in 1904. She displaced 339 tons. She had a 250,000 board feet capacity and carried both lumber and passengers. Her dimensions were 127 x 32 x10 feet with a 500 h.p. compound engine.

The Sea Foam was operated by J.H. Fritch of San Francisco who, in 1907- 08, had a fleet of three steamers: Carmel, Homer and the Sea Foam. In 1911, the Charles H. Higgins firm of San Francisco acquired the Sea Foam. His fleet of coasting steamers served ports like Mendocino, Albion and Point Arena. The Sea Foam went ashore at Point Arena February 23, 1931.

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S.F. Blunt:

The S.F.Blunt was a two masted sailing schooner that was waterlogged off the Mendocino Coast in 1868. She was refloated and wrecked off of the Mendocino Coast in 1868.

Shasta:

Built by G.H. Hitchings in Hoquiam, Washington in 1903. She displaced 722 tons. She was stranded and lost off of Point Conception in 1906.

Shasta (second of the same name):

Built by Mathewws Shipbuilding Co. in 1908 in Hoquiam, Washington. She displaced 787 tons. She was broken up in 1933 and her hull was made into a whaling barge.

Sheriff:

Sheriff was a sailing schooner captained by Captain Tibbey and she sank in a storm off the Mendocino Coast in 1852.

Shna Yak:

Built by Hall Brothers in Winslow, Washington in 1907. She displaced 839 tons. She was broken up in 1936 at San Pablo.

Shoshone:

Built by Bendixsen in Fairhaven, California in 1908. She displaced 646 tons.  Her last years were spent as a cattle carrier She sank in Hawaiian waters.

Sibyl Marston:

Built by William A. Boole in San Francisco. She displaced 1,086 tons. She was stranded and lost at Surf , California in 1909.

Signal:

Built by Fulton Iron Works in San Francisco in 1887. She displaced 475 tons. In her final years she was  a garbage ship. She foundered and was lost in San Francisco Bay in 1911.

Silas Coombs:  

The Silas Coombs was a two masted schooner launched in 1875 owned by the Little River Co. and her captain, Captain Gray. She displaced 89 tons and was lost in 1875 when the wind died and she was lost.

Silver Spring:

Built in San Francisco in 1888 she displaced 245 tons.

Siskiyou:

Built by Mathewws Shipbuilding Co. in 1912 in Aberdeen, Washington. She was broken up at San Pablo Bay.

Skylark:

Skylark was a sailing schooner. She was stranded and lost off the Mendocino Coast in 1876.

Solano:  

She was a two masted schooner launched in 1865. She was 74 feet long and had a beam of 25 feet and displaced 67 tons. She was stranded and lost in 1877 off of the Mendocino Coast.

Solano (second of the same name):

Built by Andrew Petersen in North Bend, Oregon in 1913. She dispced 943 tons.

Sotoyome:

The Sotoyome was built on the Albion River and launched on December 6, 1904. Its name was derived from the Pomo language and is said to mean ”our woods”. It was built out of native Douglas Fir by shipbuilder Andrew Peterson. The ship had a short life as a lumber carrier catching fire in December 1907 and destroyed at sea.

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South Bay:

Built in Tacoma, Washington she displaced 438 tons.She foundered and was lost in Mexican waters in 1917.

The South Coast docked in San Francisco

The South Coast docked in San Franciso

South Coast: 

The South Coast was a wooden steam schooner of 301 tons, 131.5' x 32.2 ' x 10.5' with a 150 hp engine. She was built in 1887 by Charles. G. White of San Francisco. She was purchased by the Caspar Lumber Company in 1903 from J. R. Hanify & Co. and sold in 1917 to Fyfe-Wilson Lumber Co. The "South Coast" was sold and later wrecked while owned by Hobbs, Wall & Co.

Sovereign:

The Sovereign was two masted sailing schooner who parted her moorings somewhere along the Mendocino Coast in 1862.

Sparkling Sea:

A three masted schooner owned by the Beadle Steamship Co. and commanded by Captain Wilson she displaced 127 tons. She lost her rudder and was lost off of the Mendocino Coast in 1882.

Speedwell:

The Speedwell was a sailing bark and was stranded off the Mendocino Coast in 1872.

Speedwell (second of the same name):

Built by Kruse & banks in 1912 at North Bend, Oregon. She displaced 914 tons. She was sold to East Coast interests.

The steam ship Stanley Dollar anchored at the Mendocino Shipping Point

The steam ship Stanley Dollar anchored
at the Mendocino Shipping Point.

Stanley Dollar:

A steam schooner known to have worked the Mendocino Coast doghole ports.

Stanwood:

Built by Kruse & Banks in 1916 at North Bend, Oregon. She displaced 1,129 tons.

Stina Nicholeisen:

A two masted schooner of 45 tons owned by Beadle Steamship Co. She was lost off of the Mendocino Coast between 1850 and 1950 but we cannot determine when.

The St. Yaquina loading from the chute in Mendocino Bay

The St. Yaquina loading from the chute
in Mendocino Bay

St. Yaquina:

A two masted steam schooner known to have operated in the doghole ports of the Mendocino Coast.

The wreck of the Stockton City

The wreck of the Stockton City

Stockton City:

The Stockton City was a 115 ton schooner with a gasoline engine. She was launched in 1898 and was commanded by Captain Victor Helgas. The Stockton City dragged her anchor and crashed on the rocks at Russian Gulch on December 28, 1933 with eight crew members. No one was injured.

Storm Cloud:

A two masted schooner displacing 118 tons was owned by the Mendocino Lumber Company . Her captain’s name was Smith. She was lost on November 27th 1865 in a storm. According to the Mendocino Daily Paper, The Mendocino City, “Storm Cloud, a schooner, was discovered bottom up on the beach as the day dawned. (She had been driven on shore by heavy seas. The ship was a total loss. Jerome B. Ford and others, including the [Mendocino Lumber]  Company, were its owners).

Stranger:

A sailing scow/schooner she was wrecked off of the Mendocino Coast in 1883.

Sue (Or Susie) Merrill:

Thomas Peterson built her at Russian Gulch, roughly five miles south of the Noyo in 1865. This lovely vessel was actually the first 3-masted schooner built on the Mendocino coast and was designed to carry a cargo of about 148 tons. Her proud owners, Merrill & Company of San Francisco, were aghast to see her wrecked on the south point of the Noyo entrance four hours after her launching, never to earn them one dime. Fortunately no lives were lost. She was lost in one of the worst storms on record which occurred between November 17th and 23rd, 1865 according to Mrs. Silas Coombs of Little River when she wrote about the storm in the November 28th issue of the “Ukiah Herald.

Wreck of the Sunol

Wreck of the Sunol

Wreck of the Sunol

Wreck of the Sunol

Sunol:

The Sunol was a 258 ton steam schooner, 132 foot long and 33 feet in the beam. The Sunol was built in 1890 in Alameda, California and owned by Pacific Shipping Company of San Francisco. The vessel had a carrying capacity of 375, 000 feet of lumber.  She was bought by A. Combs and Stickney Lumber Company and commanded by Captain Green. Carrying a load of railroad ties, an overturned kerosene lamp set the ship on fire in Little River and the ship was destroyed on October 24th, 1900. The Sunol was equipped with machinery from the steamer Mendocino, which wrecked at Humboldt Bay 1888.

Surprise:

Built by Charles G. White in San Francisco in 1884. She displaced 165 tons.

Susan A. Owen:

A schooner, she was stranded off the Mendocino Coast in 1878.

Susan A. Owens:

A two masted schooner she displaced 48 tons and was commanded by Captain Eriksen. She parted her lines in a storm off the Mendocino Coast in 1878 and was lost.

Svea:

Built by Bendixsen in 1906 at Fairhaven, California. She displaced 618 tons. She was laid up in Oakland Creek, San Francisco Bay.

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A Holiday Treat!
Come and see Thomas

Thomas the Tank Engine and his friend Emily will be at the Model Railroad layout (behind the Skunk Depot) from Thanksgiving till Christmas. The layout is open from 1 pm to 3:30 pm every day the Skunk Train operates.

Get your tickets at the Skunk Train Depot.