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The Ships

Vanguard:

Little is known of her except that she was wrecked off of the Mendocino Coast between 1850 and 1950.

Venture:

Launched in 1888 she was a steam schooner, 127 feet long, 33 feet across the beam and displaced 249 tons. She grounded and was lost off of the Mendocino Coast in 1892.

The wreck of the Venus on Navarro Beach

The wreck of the Venus on Navarro Beach

Venus:

A 118 ton two masted schooner built in 1875 by Jacob Whitehirst owned by Captain Adam Todd of san Francisco. The ship, loaded with railroad ties, went ashore on Navarro Beach on January 25, 1881 and five lives were lost. The wreck was caused by her lines coming loose during a storm. Heavy seas broke her up the following day.

Vanguard:

Built by John W. Dickie in 1904 at Alameda, California. She displaced 358 tons.

Venture:

Built by Hay Shipbuilding in San Francisco in 1888. She displaced 249 tons.  She was stranded and lost off of Rockport in 1892.

Verson:

The Verson was a sailing schooner that was wrecked and lost off of the Mendocino Coast in 1886.

Viking:

Built by Rolf Shipbuilding Co. in Rolph, California 1920. She displaced 1,210 tons.

Wahkeena:

Built by Wilson Brothers in 1917 at Astoria, Oregon. She displaced 1,030 tons. She was stranded and lost in Grays harbor in 1929.

Walcott:

  The Walcott was a sailing brig stranded off of the Mendocino Coast in 1863.

Wapama:

Built by St. Helens Shipbuilding Co. in 1915 at St. Helens, Oregon. She displaced 952 tons.

Walter Claxton:

The Walter Claxton was a wind powered bark that capsized off the Mendocino Coast in 1854.

Washington:

Built by Washington Marine Co. in 1906 at Seattle, Washington. She displaced 539 tons. She foundered and broke up in Humboldt Bay February 15th, 1932.

Wasp:

Built by J.H. Price in Fairhaven, California in 1905. She displaced 563 tons. She foundered and sank off of Pensacola on June 19th, 1919.

Wellesley:

Built by E. Heuckendorff at prosper, Oregon in 1907. She displaced 709 tons. She was broken up at Sausalito in 1943.

Wellingsley:

The Wellingsley was a sailing brig which sank off the Mendocino Coast in 1857.

Weott:

Built at Alameda , California in 1893. She displaced 249 tons. She was stranded on the Humboldt Bar in 1899.

The West Coast tied up at the Union Lumber Company pier in Fort Bragg in 1885

The West Coast tied up at the Union Lumber
Company pier in Fort Bragg in 1885.

West Coast:

A steam schooner with a 40 hp engine she was launched in 1885. She was 112.3 feet long, 31.25 beam and displaced 179 tons. She was built by Charles G. White in 1885 in San Francisco.  Commanded by Captain Geme she was wrecked off of the Mendocino Coast in 1891. The West Coast carried the first load of lumber out of Fort Bragg in 1886.

The Westport
Westport:

The Westport was built in 1888 in San Francisco by George W. Poole. She had a carrying capacity of 211 tons. Whether or not she was fitted first with two masts as a sailing schooner or she had a steam engine when she was launched is not known. She was built by George W. Boole . She was known to have plied the Mendocino Coast. The Westport was abandoned in Oakland Creek in 1938.

W.F. Browne:

The W.F. Browne was a sailing schooner stranded and lost off of the Mendocino Coast in 1871.

W.H. Kreuger:

A 469 ton steam schooner she was launched in 1899. She was built by John Lindstrom in Aberdeen, Washington. She foundered and was lost off of Point Arena  in 1906.

W.H. Murphy:

built by Mathewws Shipbuilding Co. in 1907 in Hoquiam, Washington. She displaced 923 tons. She caught on fire and was lost off of Trinidad in 1918.

Whitesboro:

Built by Charles G. White in 1886 at San Francisco. She displaced 195 tons. She was abandoned in Oakland Creek, San Francisco Bay.

Whitney Olson:

Built by Wilmington Shipbuilding Co. in 1917 at San Pedro, California. She displaced 1,556 tons.

Whittier:

The Whittier was a 1,295 ton tanker, 240 feet long and 32 feet at the beam. She was owned by Union Oil Company and commanded by Captain F.V. Lohen. She grounded and was lost off of the Mendocino Coast in 1922.

Willamette:

Built by Bendixsen in Fairhaven, California in 1911. She displaced 903 tons. She foundered and was lost off Crescent City in 1942.

Willapa:

Built by Kruse & Banks in 1908 at North Bend, Oregon. She displaced 752 tons.She was sold to East Coast interests.

Willapa (the second of this name):

Built by Kruse & banks in 1917 at North Bend, Oregon. She displaced 1,185 tons. She foundered and was lost off of Port Orford in 1941.

Wilmington:

Built by Kruse & Banks at Prosper, Oregon in 1913. She displaced 990 tons. She foundered and was lost on the Humboldt Bar.

Winnebago:

She was steam schooner with a triple expansion steam engine. The Winnebago was owned by the Coast Shipping Co. and commanded by Captain William Treanor. She weighed 1,065 tons, was 200 feet long and 39 feet at the beam. Launched in 1903 she was stranded and lost off of the Mendocino Coast in 1909.

Yellowstone:

Built by Bendixsen at Fairhaven, California in 1907. She displaced 707 tons. She foundered and was lost in Humboldt Bay on February 24th, 1933.

Yosemite:

Built by Bendixsen in 1906 at Fairhaven, California. She displaced 827 tons. She was stranded and lost off of Point Reyes on February 23rd, 1936.

Z.B. Heywood:  

She was launched in 1873, was 87 feet long, 29 feet across the beam and displaced 107 tons. A two masted schooner commanded by Captain Lund she wrecked off of the Mendocino Coast in 1888.

The Zilla May on the beach at Point Arena

The Zilla May on the beach at Point Arena

Zilla May:

The Zillah May was wrecked on the beach at Point Arena cove, August 9, 1914. The Zillah May, owned by L.C Endresen and E.N. Endresen, was repaired and refloated (at a cost of $10,800). The Zillah May was originally part of the pelagic sealing fleet operating in the Pacific Northwest. Pelagic sealing was ended by treaty in 1911, and the Zillah May was retrofitted with a gasoline engine, and began operation as a halibutter.

Zulu:

The Zulu was a two masted schooner lost off of the Mendocino Coast between 1850 and 1950.

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